How Time/timing is Beneficial to Growth

The change and carry-over in between growth

Fixation to particular sets of habits or traits cannot be overruled as we grow. However, there comes a time when we (unintentionally) let go of certain behaviors we adopted or usually exhibit. This is a clear sign of growth. Mental growth when you have a rethink on what you thought was the way or the best and fresh ideas on which ones to adopt.

When it’s time to grow, it doesn’t come lurking and so, there’s no need to worry or be upset about the outcome of things. Part of growing is enduring and embracing the whole process of it. So when you encounter uncomfortable signs that show you’re growing or have grown, you ought to embrace it.

Maturity isn’t something we often acknowledge immediately, it’s mostly so after a certain period. A reflective retrospective period. That’s when you measure if, how or how long you’ve matured for.

Speaking of which, there are certain behaviors you let go of and some you readopt, likewise others you adopt freshly —  as aforementioned.

The yardstick to accomplishing these most times also, is based on time/timing.

Having the time to implement a change and lacking the time to implement a change lies where certain types of growth occur.

For instance, you might have been the type, like me, that had the time to do everything you slated for the day. The time to clean up every nook and cranny of your home as scheduled. The time to attend to every little detail of work or routine you’ve got for the day/week.

Such a trait or habit is good. It’s not always exciting, but at least it keeps one going. It makes you feel productive and gives you peace of mind when well accomplished.

Suddenly, something along the line happens. Perhaps a new job, a more demanding job, or another life-changing occurrence. In which case you become overwhelmed by the craze of it all. Questions like: how do I manage my life, work? new home? My new status —  as a life partner perhaps? You start to realize that you don’t have as much time as you used to-to accomplish all those slated routines. No time to attend to their fine details either. Worst still, it becomes jarring to even think about engaging/coping with all of it.

Your personality doesn’t change simply because you missed out on the things you’d usually put affront.

In this type of situation, the best thing to do is to re-strategize. Go on a break. A long hiatus if needed, to sort yourself out. Take the time you need to sort out how things are going to be —  moving forward. For example, you might realize that you still can cope with it all. Or you might realize that it’s time to start letting some usual habits (that might be good for you) to faze out. Maybe not all yet.

If you enjoy a clean space, but you’re heavily invested in your new job, and you also have a side hustle you were all tending to before it all began, or you just had a new baby, it might be time to re-prioritize. Choose what’s most important and put it first. Do bits and pieces of the least important. It’s not so bad if you skip a day or week of clean as you’d usually do (carry-over). It’s not so bad if you had to skip writing or creating for a couple of days or months to adapt to your new status —  if that’s what you were into. Your personality doesn’t change simply because you missed out on the things you’d normally put affront.

photo credit: Dreamstime

Reiteration: Enduring and embracing the process of change is part of growth.

Learn to know when to let things go, minimize their intensity in execution, and when to either readopt an old or allow a fresh idea to change the flow. It’s all part of it.

Readopting an old habit is also a form of change. It’s part of rehabilitation, hence, growth. It means that you recognize at that point that you must implement it for one reason or another, which would help you scale through —  to the next day at least. That’s not such a bad idea. As long as you’re aimed at growing (for the better) always.

  • Don’t be afraid of change.
  • Try not to feel too unsettled with the carry-over of old healthy habits you no longer have the time for or their timing is wrong.
  • Don’t be afraid of readopting much older healthy habits that would gear you forward when their timing is right.

    Give yourself time to grow often and do not feel bad for the changes or carry-over of the usual (healthy) habit in between.
A girl who derives a lot of joy in writing. Which overtime has served as an intentional purpose to inspire people and uplift souls too. Through addressing hidden topical issues. The kind that is easily overlooked. Try me.

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